fivefiftyfive



Aug 17 Reblogged

teded:

How Tattooing Really Works

1. Tattooing causes a wound that alerts the body to begin the inflammatory process, calling immune system cells to the wound site to begin repairing the skin. Specialized cells called macrophages eat the invading material (ink) in an attempt to clean up the inflammatory mess. 

2. As these cells travel through the lymphatic system, some of them are carried back with a belly full of dye into the lymph nodes while others remain in the dermis. With no way to dispose of the pigment, the dyes inside them remain visible through the skin. 

3. Some of the ink particles are also suspended in the gel-like matrix of the dermis, while others are engulfed by dermal cells called fibroblasts. Initially, ink is deposited into the epidermis as well, but as the skin heals, the damaged epidermal cells are shed and replaced by new, dye-free cells with the topmost layer peeling off like a healing sunburn.

4. Dermal cells, however, remain in place until they die. When they do, they are taken up, ink and all, by younger cells nearby so the ink stays where it is.

5. So a single tattoo may not truly last forever, but tattoos have been around longer than any existing culture. And their continuing popularity means that the art of tattooing is here to stay.

From the TED-Ed Lesson What makes tattoos permanent? - Claudia Aguirre

Animation by TOGETHER

Aug 17 Reblogged

Body comparative #13 (1,2)

(Source: adapto)

Aug 17 Reblogged

Aug 17 Reblogged

(Source: demilked.com)

Aug 17 Reblogged

sagansense:

astronomy-to-zoology:

what is this monster?

Its a Bobbit Worm (Eunice aphroditois), a type of polychaete worm
Read more about the discovery of a 10-foot-long Bobbit Worm via Wired, watch the Bobbit Worm in action, and good luck sleeping…

This is Eunice aphroditois, also known as the bobbit worm, a mix between the Mongolian death worm, the Graboids from Tremors, the Bugs from Starship Troopers, and a rainbow — but it’s a really dangerous rainbow, like in Mario Kart. And it hunts in pretty much the most nightmarish way imaginable, digging itself into the sea floor, exposing a few inches of its body — which can grow to 10 feet long — and waiting.

Using five antennae, the bobbit worm senses passing prey, snapping down on them with supremely muscled mouth parts, called a pharynx. It does this with such speed and strength that it can split a fish in two. And that, quite frankly, would be a merciful exit. If you survive initially, you get to find out what it’s like to be yanked into the worm’s burrow and into untold nightmares.
A Daily Mail story suggested that the bobbit worm can permanently paralyze human appendages with its bristles, though Carrera-Parra and Salazar-Vallejo question this. They say a different family of worms, the fireworms, have harpoon-shaped chaetae — bristles of sorts — that release a toxin that can cause severe skin irritation, but bobbit worms “do not have abundant chaetae and their chaetae are not used for defensive purposes, but for improving traction for crawling over the sediment or inside their galleries or tubes.”



I did some research on these things to make sure they were not located somewhere they might kill me (they’re not), and I came across an earlier and eerily similar article from Scientific American. And by earlier I mean by one day, using the same quotes from the same sources and even the same photos.
I get very very suspicious anytime the Daily Mail gets quoted in a science post.

sagansense:

astronomy-to-zoology:

what is this monster?

Its a Bobbit Worm (Eunice aphroditois), a type of polychaete worm

Read more about the discovery of a 10-foot-long Bobbit Worm via Wired, watch the Bobbit Worm in action, and good luck sleeping…

This is Eunice aphroditois, also known as the bobbit worm, a mix between the Mongolian death worm, the Graboids from Tremors, the Bugs from Starship Troopers, and a rainbow — but it’s a really dangerous rainbow, like in Mario Kart. And it hunts in pretty much the most nightmarish way imaginable, digging itself into the sea floor, exposing a few inches of its body — which can grow to 10 feet long — and waiting.

image

Using five antennae, the bobbit worm senses passing prey, snapping down on them with supremely muscled mouth parts, called a pharynx. It does this with such speed and strength that it can split a fish in two. And that, quite frankly, would be a merciful exit. If you survive initially, you get to find out what it’s like to be yanked into the worm’s burrow and into untold nightmares.

A Daily Mail story suggested that the bobbit worm can permanently paralyze human appendages with its bristles, though Carrera-Parra and Salazar-Vallejo question this. They say a different family of worms, the fireworms, have harpoon-shaped chaetae — bristles of sorts — that release a toxin that can cause severe skin irritation, but bobbit worms “do not have abundant chaetae and their chaetae are not used for defensive purposes, but for improving traction for crawling over the sediment or inside their galleries or tubes.

I did some research on these things to make sure they were not located somewhere they might kill me (they’re not), and I came across an earlier and eerily similar article from Scientific American. And by earlier I mean by one day, using the same quotes from the same sources and even the same photos.

I get very very suspicious anytime the Daily Mail gets quoted in a science post.

Aug 04 Reblogged

awkwardsituationist:

"i like it when a flower or a little tuft of grass grows through a crack in the concrete. it’s so fuckin’ heroic" - george carlin

awkwardsituationist:

"i like it when a flower or a little tuft of grass grows through a crack in the concrete. it’s so fuckin’ heroic" - george carlin

Aug 04 Reblogged

myampgoesto11:

Nino Sarabutra: What will you leave behind? (2012)
100,000 unglazed porcelain skulls

myampgoesto11:

Nino Sarabutra: What will you leave behind? (2012)

100,000 unglazed porcelain skulls

Aug 04 Reblogged

zerostatereflex:

saVer-animaciones

Objects ground out of existence.

Aug 04 Reblogged

spaceplasma:

To Boldly Go Where No Man Has Gone Before

Whether and when NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft, humankind’s most distant object, broke through to interstellar space, the space between stars, has been a thorny issue. For the last year, claims have surfaced every few months that Voyager 1 has “left our solar system”.
Voyager 1 is exploring an even more unfamiliar place than our Earth’s sea floors — a place more than 11 billion miles (17 billion kilometers) away from our sun. It has been sending back so much unexpected data that the science team has been grappling with the question of how to explain all the information. None of the handful of models the Voyager team uses as blueprints have accounted for the observations about the transition between our heliosphere and the interstellar medium in detail. The team has known it might take months, or longer, to understand the data fully and draw their conclusions.
Since the 1960s, most scientists have defined our solar system as going out to the Oort Cloud, where the comets that swing by our sun on long timescales originate. That area is where the gravity of other stars begins to dominate that of the sun. It will take about 300 years for Voyager 1 to reach the inner edge of the Oort Cloud and possibly about 30,000 years to fly beyond it. Informally, of course, “solar system” typically means the planetary neighborhood around our sun. Because of this ambiguity, the Voyager team has lately favored talking about interstellar space, which is specifically the space between each star’s realm of plasma influence.
Voyager 1, which is working with a finite power supply, has enough electrical power to keep operating the fields and particles science instruments through at least 2020, which will mark 43 years of continual operation. At that point, mission managers will have to start turning off these instruments one by one to conserve power, with the last one turning off around 2025.
The spacecraft will continue sending engineering data for a few more years after the last science instrument is turned off, but after that it will be sailing on as a silent ambassador. In about 40,000 years, it will be closer to the star AC +79 3888 than our own sun. (AC +79 3888 is traveling toward us faster than we are traveling towards it, so while Alpha Centauri is the next closest star now, it won’t be in 40,000 years.) And for the rest of time, Voyager 1 will continue orbiting around the heart of the Milky Way galaxy, with our sun but a tiny point of light among many.

For more information about Voyager, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/voyager and http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov.

spaceplasma:

To Boldly Go Where No Man Has Gone Before

Whether and when NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft, humankind’s most distant object, broke through to interstellar space, the space between stars, has been a thorny issue. For the last year, claims have surfaced every few months that Voyager 1 has “left our solar system”.

Voyager 1 is exploring an even more unfamiliar place than our Earth’s sea floors — a place more than 11 billion miles (17 billion kilometers) away from our sun. It has been sending back so much unexpected data that the science team has been grappling with the question of how to explain all the information. None of the handful of models the Voyager team uses as blueprints have accounted for the observations about the transition between our heliosphere and the interstellar medium in detail. The team has known it might take months, or longer, to understand the data fully and draw their conclusions.

Since the 1960s, most scientists have defined our solar system as going out to the Oort Cloud, where the comets that swing by our sun on long timescales originate. That area is where the gravity of other stars begins to dominate that of the sun. It will take about 300 years for Voyager 1 to reach the inner edge of the Oort Cloud and possibly about 30,000 years to fly beyond it. Informally, of course, “solar system” typically means the planetary neighborhood around our sun. Because of this ambiguity, the Voyager team has lately favored talking about interstellar space, which is specifically the space between each star’s realm of plasma influence.

Voyager 1, which is working with a finite power supply, has enough electrical power to keep operating the fields and particles science instruments through at least 2020, which will mark 43 years of continual operation. At that point, mission managers will have to start turning off these instruments one by one to conserve power, with the last one turning off around 2025.

The spacecraft will continue sending engineering data for a few more years after the last science instrument is turned off, but after that it will be sailing on as a silent ambassador. In about 40,000 years, it will be closer to the star AC +79 3888 than our own sun. (AC +79 3888 is traveling toward us faster than we are traveling towards it, so while Alpha Centauri is the next closest star now, it won’t be in 40,000 years.) And for the rest of time, Voyager 1 will continue orbiting around the heart of the Milky Way galaxy, with our sun but a tiny point of light among many.

For more information about Voyager, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/voyager and http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov.

Aug 04 Reblogged

victoriousvocabulary:

SEMPITERNAL
[adjective]
everlasting; eternal.
Etymology: late Middle English < Late Latin sempiternālis.
[Andrew Forrest - Octaves of Infinity]

victoriousvocabulary:

SEMPITERNAL

[adjective]

everlasting; eternal.

Etymology: late Middle English < Late Latin sempiternālis.

[Andrew Forrest - Octaves of Infinity]

Aug 04

Are you Muse — Anonymous

Yes, this is Muse. Hello

Jul 29 Reblogged

coexistwiththechill:

Matt Bellamy writes you a lovely note

coexistwiththechill:

Matt Bellamy writes you a lovely note

Jul 29 Reblogged

(Source: the-first-law)

Jul 29 Reblogged

alltheholesinoursouls:

Sing For Absolution (Acoustic Version) - Muse

"Lips are turning blue
A kiss that can’t renew
I only dream of you
My beautiful”

Jul 29 Reblogged

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