fivefiftyfive



Jul 22 Reblogged

Jul 22 Reblogged

Jul 22 Reblogged

Jul 22 Reblogged

Jul 21 Reblogged

jtotheizzoe:

Forty-five years ago today, two human beings first set foot on the moon. On July 20, 1969, the lunar module of Apollo 11 touched down in the Sea of Tranquility, and forever changed how we view our place in the universe. When I think about the fact that four and a half decades ago, at the very moment I am writing this, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were walking on the freakin’ moon, I am humbled and inspired.

I’ve combined some of my favorite photos from Apollo 11 with some of the actual words spoken by Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins.

If you’d like to relive the historic mission moment by moment, word by word, and photo by photo, head over to SpaceLog

Jul 21 Reblogged

actegratuit:

Photographer Guy Talcaptures glimpses of color in the harsh terrain of the American West.

(Source: theinspirationgrid.com)

Jul 21 Reblogged

fastcodesign:

On Tuesday, a bonsai tree boldly went where no bonsai tree has gone before.

Azuma Makoto, a 38-year-old artist based in Tokyo, launched two botanical arrangements into orbit: “Shiki 1,” a Japanese white pine bonsai tree suspended from a metal frame, and an untitled arrangement of orchids, lilies, hydrangeas, and irises.

Read More>

Jul 21 Reblogged

“Another thing that got forgotten was the fact that against all probability a sperm whale had suddenly been called into existence several miles above the surface of an alien planet.And since this is not a naturally tenable position for a whale, this poor innocent creature had very little time to come to terms with its identity as a whale before it then had to come to terms with not being a whale any more.This is a complete record of its thoughts from the moment it began its life till the moment it ended it.Ah … ! What’s happening? it thought.Er, excuse me, who am I?Hello?Why am I here? What’s my purpose in life?What do I mean by who am I?Calm down, get a grip now … oh! this is an interesting sensation, what is it? It’s a sort of … yawning, tingling sensation in my … my … well I suppose I’d better start finding names for things if I want to make any headway in what for the sake of what I shall call an argument I shall call the world, so let’s call it my stomach.Good. Ooooh, it’s getting quite strong. And hey, what’s about this whistling roaring sound going past what I’m suddenly going to call my head? Perhaps I can call that … wind! Is that a good name? It’ll do … perhaps I can find a better name for it later when I’ve found out what it’s for. It must be something very important because there certainly seems to be a hell of a lot of it. Hey! What’s this thing? This … let’s call it a tail – yeah, tail. Hey! I can can really thrash it about pretty good can’t I? Wow! Wow! That feels great! Doesn’t seem to achieve very much but I’ll probably find out what it’s for later on. Now – have I built up any coherent picture of things yet?No.Never mind, hey, this is really exciting, so much to find out about, so much to look forward to, I’m quite dizzy with anticipation …Or is it the wind?There really is a lot of that now isn’t it?And wow! Hey! What’s this thing suddenly coming towards me very fast? Very very fast. So big and flat and round, it needs a big wide sounding name like … ow … ound … round … ground! That’s it! That’s a good name – ground!I wonder if it will be friends with me?And the rest, after a sudden wet thud, was silence.Curiously enough, the only thing that went through the mind of the bowl of petunias as it fell was “Oh no, not again.” Many people have speculated that if we knew exactly why the bowl of petunias had thought that we would know a lot more about the nature of the universe than we do now.”
- Douglas Adams

“Another thing that got forgotten was the fact that against all probability a sperm whale had suddenly been called into existence several miles above the surface of an alien planet.

And since this is not a naturally tenable position for a whale, this poor innocent creature had very little time to come to terms with its identity as a whale before it then had to come to terms with not being a whale any more.

This is a complete record of its thoughts from the moment it began its life till the moment it ended it.

Ah … ! What’s happening? it thought.

Er, excuse me, who am I?

Hello?

Why am I here? What’s my purpose in life?

What do I mean by who am I?

Calm down, get a grip now … oh! this is an interesting sensation, what is it? It’s a sort of … yawning, tingling sensation in my … my … well I suppose I’d better start finding names for things if I want to make any headway in what for the sake of what I shall call an argument I shall call the world, so let’s call it my stomach.

Good. Ooooh, it’s getting quite strong. And hey, what’s about this whistling roaring sound going past what I’m suddenly going to call my head? Perhaps I can call that … wind! Is that a good name? It’ll do … perhaps I can find a better name for it later when I’ve found out what it’s for. It must be something very important because there certainly seems to be a hell of a lot of it. Hey! What’s this thing? This … let’s call it a tail – yeah, tail. Hey! I can can really thrash it about pretty good can’t I? Wow! Wow! That feels great! Doesn’t seem to achieve very much but I’ll probably find out what it’s for later on. Now – have I built up any coherent picture of things yet?

No.

Never mind, hey, this is really exciting, so much to find out about, so much to look forward to, I’m quite dizzy with anticipation …

Or is it the wind?

There really is a lot of that now isn’t it?

And wow! Hey! What’s this thing suddenly coming towards me very fast? Very very fast. So big and flat and round, it needs a big wide sounding name like … ow … ound … round … ground! That’s it! That’s a good name – ground!

I wonder if it will be friends with me?

And the rest, after a sudden wet thud, was silence.

Curiously enough, the only thing that went through the mind of the bowl of petunias as it fell was “Oh no, not again.” Many people have speculated that if we knew exactly why the bowl of petunias had thought that we would know a lot more about the nature of the universe than we do now.”

- Douglas Adams

Jul 21 Reblogged

escapekit:

 Chromatic Typewriter Prints

Tyree Callahan has recycled (or upcycled, perhaps) a classic 1937 Underwood typewriter by replacing letters with sponges soaked across the spectrum with bright yellows, reds, blues and combinations thereof.

Jul 15 Reblogged

indefenseofart:

A brilliant ad campaign by Y&R for the French opticians, Keloptic. The tagline (inserted as wall labels) is “Turning Impressionism into Hyperrealism,” and indeed, the Gogh, Monet, and Seurat’s works viewed through glasses are photographic rather than “impressionistic”! Thoughts?

Jul 15 Reblogged

huffingtonpost:

Want more mesmerizing art GIFs? Artist Erdal Inci’s hypnotizing never-ending loops GIFs will blow your mind. 
(Source: Imgur)

Jul 15 Reblogged

replicanttt:

Clair De Lune - Debussy 

Jul 15 Reblogged

fw1991:

"Ice circles," a rare natural phenomenon that occurs in slow moving water in cold climates. They are thin and circular slabs of ice that rotate slowly in the water.
Gary Lane

fw1991:

"Ice circles," a rare natural phenomenon that occurs in slow moving water in cold climates. They are thin and circular slabs of ice that rotate slowly in the water.

Gary Lane

(Source: vvolare)

Jul 15 Reblogged

victoriousvocabulary:

COSMOPOIETIC
[adjective]
cosmos-producing; world-creating.
Etymology: from Greek kosmopoiētikos, from kosm- cosm-,  world, universe, order” + poiētikos, “capable of making, creative, poetical”.
 [Freydoon Rassouli - Cosmic Attraction]

victoriousvocabulary:

COSMOPOIETIC

[adjective]

cosmos-producing; world-creating.

Etymology: from Greek kosmopoiētikos, from kosm- cosm-,
world, universe, order” + poiētikos, “capable of making, creative, poetical”.

 [Freydoon Rassouli - Cosmic Attraction]

Jul 15 Reblogged

myampgoesto11:

Photographic soap bubble studies by Santiago Betancur Z  that look like planets  

Photographer and painter Santiago Betancur Z explores the intersection between science and abstract art in his photographic studies of bubbles, as well as producing life-size figure painting. In his photographs and video recordings, Betancur Z captures imagery of soap bubbles against dark backgrounds, showcasing the random kaleidoscopic color and light effects produced by the delicate spheres, and the chance allusions that occur in their surfaces

Watch this beautiful collaboration between Santiago Betancur Z and musician Julian De La Chica

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