fivefiftyfive



Sep 09 Reblogged

biomedicalephemera:

Have some time on your hands? Know how to read? Want to help science?

Join me at the Smithsonian Digital Volunteers Transcription Center!

There are thousands of collection items, field journals, and cataloged diaries and specimens at the Smithsonian, and because the pages and data are hand-written or irregular, digital transcription is unable to decode them.

This is where the Digital Volunteers come in! By transcribing and double-checking the transcription efforts of others prior to final review by Smithsonian staffers, we save the Smithsonian thousands of hours of initial squinting and trying to make sense of semi-illegible words.

Cursive is largely not taught in schools anymore, but the scientific value of these documents and specimens will still be true long after we’re gone. By transcribing things now and getting them into a digital database that can be searched and organized, scientists and historians of both tomorrow and decades in the future will benefit.

There are more difficult transcription pieces (such as the top page posted here), as well as very simple and easy-to-read pieces, such as The Bumblebee Project (SO MANY BEES).

This is where I procrastinate, these days. It’s strangely addicting.

Sep 09 Reblogged

the manuscripts of the masters: scientists

albert einstein, ph.d., physics
marie curie, ph.d., physics, chemistry
nikola tesla, electrical&mechanical engineering
george washington carver, m.s., botany
rosalind franklin, ph.d., biophysics
charles darwin, evolutionary biology
thomas edison, electrical&mechanical engineering

Sep 09 Reblogged

neurosciencestuff:

What’s Lost as Handwriting Fades
Does handwriting matter?
Not very much, according to many educators. The Common Core standards, which have been adopted in most states, call for teaching legible writing, but only in kindergarten and first grade. After that, the emphasis quickly shifts to proficiency on the keyboard.
But psychologists and neuroscientists say it is far too soon to declare handwriting a relic of the past. New evidence suggests that the links between handwriting and broader educational development run deep.
Children not only learn to read more quickly when they first learn to write by hand, but they also remain better able to generate ideas and retain information. In other words, it’s not just what we write that matters — but how.
Read more

neurosciencestuff:

What’s Lost as Handwriting Fades

Does handwriting matter?

Not very much, according to many educators. The Common Core standards, which have been adopted in most states, call for teaching legible writing, but only in kindergarten and first grade. After that, the emphasis quickly shifts to proficiency on the keyboard.

But psychologists and neuroscientists say it is far too soon to declare handwriting a relic of the past. New evidence suggests that the links between handwriting and broader educational development run deep.

Children not only learn to read more quickly when they first learn to write by hand, but they also remain better able to generate ideas and retain information. In other words, it’s not just what we write that matters — but how.

Read more

Sep 09 Reblogged

victoriousvocabulary:

AFFLATUS
[noun]
1. inspiration; an impelling mental force acting from within; a sudden rush of creative impulse or inspiration, often attributed to divine influence.
2. divine communication of knowledge.
3. a breath or blast of wind.
4. blown, breathed on, having been blown or breathed on.
Etymology: from Latin afflatus, originally adflatu (compare English flatulence, “digestive gas, fart”), past participle of afflo, “to blow on”. In artistic sense, introduced by Cicero in De Natura Deorum (The Nature of the Gods) (44 BCE), as alternative to existing and similar inspiration (literally “sucking in air”).
[Autumn Skye Morrison - Devotion]

victoriousvocabulary:

AFFLATUS

[noun]

1. inspiration; an impelling mental force acting from within; a sudden rush of creative impulse or inspiration, often attributed to divine influence.

2. divine communication of knowledge.

3. a breath or blast of wind.

4. blown, breathed on, having been blown or breathed on.

Etymology: from Latin afflatus, originally adflatu (compare English flatulence, “digestive gas, fart”), past participle of afflo, “to blow on”. In artistic sense, introduced by Cicero in De Natura Deorum (The Nature of the Gods) (44 BCE), as alternative to existing and similar inspiration (literally “sucking in air”).

[Autumn Skye Morrison - Devotion]

Sep 08 Reblogged

(Source: thirdeyegang)

Sep 08 Reblogged

victoriousvocabulary:

TEMULENCE
[noun]
intoxication; inebriation; drunkenness; any mild-altering affect by a drug.
Etymology: from Latin temulentus < temetum, “an intoxicating drink”.
[Cheong-ah Hwang]

victoriousvocabulary:

TEMULENCE

[noun]

intoxication; inebriation; drunkenness; any mild-altering affect by a drug.

Etymology: from Latin temulentus < temetum, “an intoxicating drink”.

[Cheong-ah Hwang]

Sep 08 Reblogged

nevver:

The fantastic fungi, Steve Axford

(Source: steveaxford.smugmug.com)

Sep 08 Reblogged

lemond:

(via Art and Movie Posters – III – Andy Warhol | Inspired Movie Posters)

Sep 08 Reblogged

(Source: deadstarworld)

Sep 08 Reblogged

Aug 31 Reblogged

(Source: wonderlandvibes)

Aug 31 Reblogged

sagansense:

rewet:

Burning copper tubing in flames = rainbow flames

Related: Brian Cox explains spectroscopy by burning chemical elements in the “Stardust” episode of BBC’s ‘Wonders of the Universe’

Aug 31 Reblogged

Aug 31 Reblogged

staceythinx:

Spectacular images of lava by Bruce Omori

Aug 31 Reblogged

silversora:

"Dave.."
"Fuck off Shaun I am taking a picture."
"DAVE."

silversora:

"Dave.."

"Fuck off Shaun I am taking a picture."

"DAVE."

(Source: stigmartyr762)

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