fivefiftyfive



Aug 31 Reblogged

(Source: wonderlandvibes)

Aug 31 Reblogged

sagansense:

rewet:

Burning copper tubing in flames = rainbow flames

Related: Brian Cox explains spectroscopy by burning chemical elements in the “Stardust” episode of BBC’s ‘Wonders of the Universe’

Aug 31 Reblogged

Aug 31 Reblogged

staceythinx:

Spectacular images of lava by Bruce Omori

Aug 31 Reblogged

silversora:

"Dave.."
"Fuck off Shaun I am taking a picture."
"DAVE."

silversora:

"Dave.."

"Fuck off Shaun I am taking a picture."

"DAVE."

(Source: stigmartyr762)

Aug 31 Reblogged

myampgoesto11:

Cai Guo-Qiang: Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter (2014)

Gunpowder drawing on porcelain as part of installation “Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter” at Power Station of Art, Shanghai

Aug 31 Reblogged

Aug 31 Reblogged

(Source: angulargeometry)

Aug 26 Reblogged

asylum-art:

The New Cruelty: “Bodies & Skulls”- (James Bareham)

on Behance

The New Cruelty was commissioned to New York based television production company True Entertainment to photograph a series of still-life images of preserved human skulls, bodies and various internal organs featured in the famous Bodies Exhibition. These images were used to illustrate and explain complex illnesses for the show Mystery Diagnosis on Oprah Winfrey’s Network – OWN.

Aug 26 Reblogged

moshita:

Deconstruction of the human body

The process involves destroying a completed sculpture. The remains are later loosely put back together to resemble its broken condition.

Christian Zucconi

Aug 26 Reblogged

(Source: villiago)

Aug 26 Reblogged

dbvictoria:

Temporary tattoos could make electronic telepathy and telekinesis possible

Temporary electronic tattoos could soon help people fly drones with only thought and talk seemingly telepathically without speech over smartphones, researchers say. Electrical engineer Todd Coleman at the University of California at San Diego is devising noninvasive means of controlling machines via the mind, techniques virtually everyone might be able to use.

Commanding machines using the brain is no longer the stuff of science fiction. In recent years, brain implants have enabled people to control robotics using only their minds, raising the prospect that one day patients could overcome disabilities using bionic limbs or mechanical exoskeletons.

But brain implants are invasive technologies, probably of use only to people in medical need of them. Instead, Coleman and his team are developing wireless flexible electronics one can apply on the forehead just like temporary tattoos to read brain activity.

"We want something we can use in the coffee shop to have fun," Coleman says.

The devices are less than 100 microns thick, the average diameter of a human hair. They consist of circuitry embedded in a layer or rubbery polyester that allow them to stretch, bend and wrinkle. They are barely visible when placed on skin, making them easy to conceal from others.

The devices can detect electrical signals linked with brain waves, and incorporate solar cells for power and antennas that allow them to communicate wirelessly or receive energy. Other elements can be added as well, like thermal sensors to monitor skin temperature and light detectors to analyze blood oxygen levels.

Using the electronic tattoos, Coleman and his colleagues have found they can detect brain signals reflective of mental states, such as recognition of familiar images. One application they are now pursuing is monitoring premature babies to detect the onset of seizures that can lead to epilepsy or brain development problems. The devices are now being commercialized for use as consumer, digital health, medical device, and industrial and defense products by startup MC10 in Cambridge, Mass.

READ MORE

Aug 17 Reblogged

teded:

How Tattooing Really Works

1. Tattooing causes a wound that alerts the body to begin the inflammatory process, calling immune system cells to the wound site to begin repairing the skin. Specialized cells called macrophages eat the invading material (ink) in an attempt to clean up the inflammatory mess. 

2. As these cells travel through the lymphatic system, some of them are carried back with a belly full of dye into the lymph nodes while others remain in the dermis. With no way to dispose of the pigment, the dyes inside them remain visible through the skin. 

3. Some of the ink particles are also suspended in the gel-like matrix of the dermis, while others are engulfed by dermal cells called fibroblasts. Initially, ink is deposited into the epidermis as well, but as the skin heals, the damaged epidermal cells are shed and replaced by new, dye-free cells with the topmost layer peeling off like a healing sunburn.

4. Dermal cells, however, remain in place until they die. When they do, they are taken up, ink and all, by younger cells nearby so the ink stays where it is.

5. So a single tattoo may not truly last forever, but tattoos have been around longer than any existing culture. And their continuing popularity means that the art of tattooing is here to stay.

From the TED-Ed Lesson What makes tattoos permanent? - Claudia Aguirre

Animation by TOGETHER

Aug 17 Reblogged

Body comparative #13 (1,2)

(Source: adapto)

Aug 17 Reblogged

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